2017 Cat Practice Calendar

catpractice

It’s that time of year again. We all had so much fun with our 2016 “Cat Practice Family” calendar, we’re going to do it again for 2017! If you want your kitty to be a poster pin-up cat, take your best shot and send it to The Cat Practice so we can highlight your feline family member as a monthly model for our 2017 cat calendar. We will pick the best photos submitted to represent each month.

Photo Submission Rules and Instructions:

Kitty photos will be accepted until November 1, 2016. If you would like to submit your cat’s photo for display on our 2017 calendar, please e-mail it (maximum of three pictures per cat) to calendar@catpractice.com. Pictures should be no smaller than 1 megapixel. Please also include the following information with your e-mail submission:

  1. Your name
  2. Your pet’s name
  3. City, state, and country
  4. The following statement MUST be copied and attached to your photo:

I agree that I am an amateur photographer of at least 18 years of age. I hereby grant The Cat Practice, Inc. the non-exclusive royalty/free irrevocable rights, exercisable in its sole discretion, to use, reproduce, copy, publish, display, distribute, perform, translate, adapt, modify, and otherwise use the images (in whole or in part) and to incorporate the image(s) in any and all market and media. I have the exclusive right to grant such rights to The Cat Practice, Inc. I agree to allow use of my cat’s name in publicity or advertising without compensation. I understand and agree that The Cat Practice shall have no obligation to copy, publish, display, or otherwise use the images, nor shall it be obligated to prevent or have any liability for, any unauthorized copying, publishing, displaying, or use of images.

When Will the Calendars Be Available?

The 2017 Cat Practice Calendar will be available for Christmas, just in time for the New Year, and will make great stocking stuffers. So, send your best kitty pics today, and give us a call at
(504) 525-6369 if you have any questions. We can’t wait to see your photos!

Vaccines Matter…!!!!

So, it’s time for your kitty’s “shots.”  You bring your cat to your veterinarian and your vet gives your cat its vaccinations.  You feel your responsibility as a pet owner is satisfied, your cat is mad that it went to the vet, and the world is as it should be.

But, is it?  Here’s the problem: all feline vaccines are NOT created equal.  Since the early 1990’s, it was known that some vaccines (as well as some medications that veterinarians inject into cats) can cause problems.  Specifically, the chronic inflammation produced by some vaccines can eventually be the cause of the production of malignant and fatal tumors under the skin of a cat.  These tumor-causing vaccines have a component in them known as an adjuvant which has specifically been known to be the cause to these tumors.

Since 1992, The Cat Practice has not used any vaccine that has contained an adjuvant.  These non-adjuvant vaccines are more expensive than other, adjuvant-containing vaccines; but, we believe that we cannot ethically inject a feline patient with a substance known to potentially cause harm….no matter  the risk.

Please read the Position paper of the American Veterinary Medical Association on this subject.  There are other scientific papers explaining the phenomenon of vaccine associated tumors in cats below as well.   We think this will help you understand how and why The Cat Practice takes the health and well-being of your feline family member so seriously.

What Adjuvants Do

How Tumors Develop Inflammation and Cancer

The Importance of Wellness Exams

Cat Wellness Exams in New Orleans

The Cat Practice is concerned about your feline family members. Did you know that indoor cats can be susceptible to certain diseases and parasites, just like outdoor cats? These include heart disease, kidney disease, heartworm disease, arthritis, urinary problems, feline “asthma,” dental disease, thyroid disease, diabetes, intestinal parasites, and external parasites (fleas). Also keep in mind that cats are masters at hiding illness, often until they are very sick, which is why annual feline wellness exams are so important. Wellness exams allow our doctors to examine your feline friend from nose to tail and determine if advanced diagnostic care is necessary (blood work, X-rays, etc.) or if treatment is recommended.

Please call The Cat Practice today at (504) 525-6369 to schedule a wellness exam for your kitty so we can spot diseases early, before major problems arise. With an annual wellness exam, you can increase the chances of your cat living a long, healthy life.

Top 10 Cat Emergencies

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Cats often become reclusive and hide when they are not feeling well, which makes knowing when they need to be seen by your veterinarian a challenge. They have unique signs of emergency conditions that often go unrecognized by owners. Some injuries are obvious, such as a cat with an open wound, while others have more subtle signs that can be equally dangerous if left untreated. Knowing signs of illness is crucial in determining when to seek emergency care for your cat. Below is a list of some of the most common cat emergencies and their signs.

 

Urethral Obstruction

This is a condition in which a cat, usually male, is unable to urinate due to a blockage in the urethra (the tube leading from the urinary bladder to the outside environment).

 

Cats will show a sudden onset of restless behavior, which includes frequent trips in and out of the litter box. They will often attempt to urinate in unusual places such as in a bath tub or on a plastic bag. You may notice a very small stream of urine that contains blood. More often than not, despite a cat’s straining, there may be no urine or even just a drop produced. In later stages of the obstruction, cats may cry loudly, vomit, and become lethargic.

 

You should consider these signs a serious emergency and seek veterinary care immediately. There are reports of cats developing kidney failure and dying within 12 hours after the onset of signs. Expect your cat to be hospitalized at least 36 hours for treatment of this condition. Veterinary treatments may include a urinary catheter, intravenous fluids, and pain management. Female cats are less likely to become obstructed due to their wider urinary tract.

 

Toxicities (Poisoning)

The combination of their curious nature and unique metabolism (the way their body breaks down chemicals) makes cats vulnerable to toxins. Owners are often unaware that their home contains multiple products that are poisonous to felines. The most common cat toxins include antifreeze, Tylenol, and rat or mouse poison.

 

The signs your cat displays depends on the type of poison he or she has encountered. Antifreeze will often cause wobbliness or a drunken appearance first, then progresses to vomiting/weakness as the kidneys fail. Tylenol may cause an unusual swelling of the head and changes the cat’s blood color from red to chocolate brown. Rat or mouse poison interferes with blood clotting so you may see weakness from internal blood loss or visible blood in the urine or stool.

 

Breathing Problems

Often, cats hide the signs of breathing problems by simply decreasing their activity. By the time an owner notices changes in the cat’s breathing, it may be late in the progression of the cat’s lung disease. There are several causes of breathing changes, but the most common are feline asthma, heart disease, or lung disease.

 

Foreign Object Ingestion

Many cats love to play with strings or string-like objects (such as dental floss, holiday tinsel, or ribbon), but those strings can be dangerous for your cat. When a string is ingested by a cat, one end may become lodged or “fixed” in place, often under the cat’s tongue, while the rest of the string passes further into the intestine. With each intestinal contraction, the string see-saws back and forth actually cutting into the intestine and damaging the blood supply.

 

Signs that your cat has eaten a foreign object may include vomiting, lack of appetite, diarrhea, and weakness. Occasionally owners will actually see part of a string coming from the mouth or anal area. You should never pull on any part of the string that is visible; instead, call your veterinary health care team immediately.

 

Surgery is usually necessary to remove the foreign object and any damaged sections of intestine.

 

Bite Wounds

Cats are notorious for both inflicting and suffering bite wounds during encounters with other cats. Because the tips of their canine, or “fang,” teeth are so small and pointed, bites are often not noticed until infection sets in, which is usually several days after the initial injury.

 

Cats may develop a fever and become lethargic 48 to 72 hours after experiencing a penetrating bite wound. They may be tender or painful at the site. If the wound becomes infected or abscessed, swelling and foul-smelling drainage may develop.

 

You should seek emergency care for bite wounds so your veterinarian can thoroughly clean the area and prescribe appropriate antibiotics. Occasionally, the wounds can develop large pockets called abscesses under the skin that require surgical placement of a drain to aid in healing.

 

Hit By Car

Cats that spend time outdoors are at a much greater risk for ending up in the emergency room. Being hit by a car is one of the most common causes of traumatic injuries, such as broken bones, lung injuries, and head trauma. You should always seek emergency care if your cat has been hit by a vehicle, even if he or she appears normal, because many injuries can develop or worsen over the following few hours.

 

Increased Thirst and Urination

Sudden changes in your cat’s thirst and urine volume are important clues to underlying disease. The two most common causes of these changes are kidney disease and diabetes mellitus.

 

Your veterinarian will need to check blood and urine samples to determine the cause of your cat’s change in thirst and urine. Having your pet seen on an emergency basis for these signs is important because prompt treatment increases chances for recovery. Exposure to certain toxins, such as antifreeze or lilies, will show similar signs, and delaying veterinary care can be fatal.

 

Sudden Inability to Use the Hind Legs

Cats with some forms of heart disease are at risk for developing blood clots. These clots can sometimes lodge in a large blood vessel—the aorta—where they can prevent normal blood flow to the hind legs. If your cat experiences such a blood clotting episode (often called a saddle thrombus or thromboembolic episode), you will likely see a sudden loss of the use of his or her hind legs, painful crying, and breathing changes.

 

On arrival at the emergency room, your cat will receive pain management and oxygen support. Tests will be done to evaluate the cat’s heart and determine if there is any heart failure (fluid accumulation in the lungs). Sadly, such an episode is often the first clue for an owner that his or her cat has severe heart disease. In most cases, with time and support, the blood clot can resolve, but the cat’s heart disease will require lifelong treatment.

 

Upper Respiratory Infections

Cats and kittens can experience a variety of upper respiratory diseases caused by a combination of bacteria or viruses. An upper respiratory infections, or URI, can cause sneezing, runny nose, runny eyes, lack of appetite, and fever. In severe cases, it can cause ulcers in the mouth, on the tongue, and on the eyes. More often than not, severe cases are seen in cats that have recently been in multiple-cat environments, such as shelters. Small kittens, or kittens struggling to thrive, are also easily infected and may develop more severe complications, such as low blood sugar.

 

Sudden Blindness

A sudden loss of vision is most likely to occur in an older cat. The most common cause is increased blood pressure (hypertension), which may be due to changes in thyroid function (hyperthyroidism) or kidney disease. There are some cats that appear to have hypertension with no other underlying disease.

 

Sudden blindness should be treated as an emergency and your veterinarian will measure your cat’s blood pressure, check blood tests, and start medications to lower the pressure and restore vision.

 

If you notice a change in your cat’s eyes, whether he or she loses vision or not, you should consider this an emergency have your pet seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible.

 

 

Disclaimer: This website is not intended to replace professional consultation, diagnosis, or treatment by a licensed veterinarian. If you require any veterinary-related advice, contact your veterinarian promptly. Information at cathealth.com is exclusively of a general reference nature. Do not disregard veterinary advice or delay treatment as a result of accessing information at this site.

 

 

SOURCE: http://www.cathealth.com/safety/top-ten-emergencies-in-cats

Endymeow 2016 Royalty Announcement

On WWL’s Morning Show on Monday, January 18, between the 8 and 9 o’clock hours, the King and Queen of Endymeow 2016 and their Royal Families will be announced by Morning Show host Eric Paulsen.  The King and Queen will make a live, personal  appearance, resplendent in their finest Mardi Gras regalia.

 

So, if you want to see the King and Queen of Endymeow 2016, turn your TV’s to WWL on Monday Morning, January 18, between the hours of 8 and 9 AM .

 

We look forward to seeing everyone at Endymeow 2016 (Friday, January 22, from 7-9 PM at The Cat Practice) to help us celebrate the reign of this year’s monarchs.

Annual Endymeow in New Orleans

Do you have royalty in your household? As Endymeow 2016 draws near, The Cat Practice in New Orleans is pleased to announce we are now accepting nominations for the Royal Court of Endymeow 2016. Dress your kitty in his/her finest Mardi Gras regalia (a pair of beads or go all out in your cat’s finest costume) and email the photo to see if your kitty is chosen to be on the Royal Court. Don’t you want to see your cat as a duke or a maid? The pictures will be displayed at Endymeow 2016 and on our Facebook page after the event and will be enshrined on our website permanently.

Please email your kitty’s Mardi Gras portrait to endymeow@catpractice.com, and follow us on Facebook to look for your kitty’s pic on our page. When you send a picture of your cat in his/her Mardi Gras finest, you will receive an invitation to Endymeow 2016. If you have any questions about the photo submission policy or about Endymeow, give us a call at 504-525-6369. Take a look at the winners from 2015!

Annual Endymeow in New Orleans
Annual Endymeow in New Orleans

Happy Mardi Gras…..!!!!!!

View more pictures from Endymeow 2015

Holiday Cat Safety Tips

Holiday Cat Safety Tips in New Orleans, LA

From decorations to toxic foods, the holiday season can be a dangerous time for a cat, but the team at The Cat Practice in New Orleans is determined to make it safe for your feline friend. Consider the following holiday cat safety tips, and have a very merry Christmas and joy-filled new year with your family!

Christmas Decorations in NOLA

They shine, they sparkle, and they add a nice finishing touch to Christmas trees and gifts, but some of those decorations can be hazardous to your cat. High on the list are tinsel, garland, and ribbons. You’re probably well aware of the curious nature of cats and how easily drawn they are to stringy, sparkly things. Many cats have been known to even eat these things, but this can result in intestinal blockage and land them in the emergency room for pet surgery. We know that’s the last place you want to spend the holidays with your cat, so keep these stringy decorations out of your cat’s reach or simply avoid using them altogether.

Seasonal Plants Could be Dangerous for Cats

Is there mistletoe and holly hanging high above your doorway? If so, make sure it stays up there, out of your cat’s reach. Mistletoe and holly are just a couple of the many plants that are known to be mildly to moderately toxic to cats. If ingested, symptoms can include your cat to vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and even seizures. Other toxic seasonal plants include poinsettias (mildly toxic) and lilies (moderately to severely toxic). To keep your cat safe, simply keep these poisonous plants out of their reach or buy artificial plants instead.

Christmas and New Years Parties for Cats

Hosting a Christmas or New Year’s Eve party at your place this year? Don’t forget to consider your cat’s safety during the planning. If your cat is the social type, make sure to keep an eye on them around your guests, especially if your cat has claws. Remember to also consider the possibility of any of your guests having allergies. If you decide it’s best—both for your cat and your guests—to not include your furry friend on the party festivities, keep your cat in a separate room where they can relax.

If you have any questions about these cat holiday tips, or if you’d like to schedule an appointment at The Cat Practice, give us a call at 504-525-6369

Get your 2016 The Cat Practice Calendar!

Get your 2016 The Cat Practice Calendars today as quantities are running low! Call us today at (504) 525-6369 to put in your order!

calendar for asia.20.07

The third annual Cat Practice Calendar 2016 is out!

It’s purrfect for keeping up with your busy schedules and it makes a great gift to any cat fanatics (including you) that you might know. It features all the kitties that are (or want to be…!!!) part of our Cat Practice family of felines. This year, we are featuring the models on our Facebook (The Cat Practice NOLA). So, visit us there to see ALL the beautiful images of cats that were submitted to us for our calendar, including the ones that were chosen as models. Give us your comments. The calendars are only $19.99; and, we have a limited number at The Cat Practice. So, if you want one, call Ginja or JoAnn and reserve yours today. They make great Christmas gifts…for family members and friends. We look forward to hearing from you to order yours, and get your pics ready of your cat for next year’s 2017 Cat Practice calendar!

Anzelmo, Dusty Beane Kitties Cagle, Moti calendar for asia.20.07 Emmons, Bella1 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Fuoco, Hermionie Gokturk, Bertrand Huggins,Poulinho (2) Izen, Bindy and Bastien Lester, Charlie3

New Orleans’ 2016 Cat Practice Calendar

Calendar for Cats and Kittens in New Orleans

It’s that time of year again. We all had so much fun with our 2015 “Cat Practice Family” calendar, we’re going to do it again for 2016! If you want your kitty to be a poster pin-up cat, take your best shot and send it to The Cat Practice so we can highlight your feline family member as a monthly model for our 2016 cat calendar. We will pick the best photos submitted to represent each month.

Photo Submission Rules and Instructions:

Kitty photos will be accepted until November 1, 2015. If you would like to submit your cat’s photo for display on our 2016 calendar, please e-mail it (maximum of three pictures per cat) to calendar@catpractice.com. Pictures should be no smaller than 1 megapixel. Please also include the following information with your e-mail submission:

  1. Your name
  2. Your pet’s name
  3. City, state, and country
  4. The following statement MUST be copied and attached to your photo:

I agree that I am an amateur photographer of at least 18 years of age. I hereby grant The Cat Practice, Inc. the non-exclusive royalty/free irrevocable rights, exercisable in its sole discretion, to use, reproduce, copy, publish, display, distribute, perform, translate, adapt, modify, and otherwise use the images (in whole or in part) and to incorporate the image(s) in any and all market and media. I have the exclusive right to grant such rights to The Cat Practice, Inc. I agree to allow use of my cat’s name in publicity or advertising without compensation. I understand and agree that The Cat Practice shall have no obligation to copy, publish, display, or otherwise use the images, nor shall it be obligated to prevent or have any liability for, any unauthorized copying, publishing, displaying, or use of images.

When Will the Calendars Be Available?

The 2016 Cat Practice Calendar will be available for Christmas, just in time for the New Year, and will make great stocking stuffers. So, send your best kitty pics today, and give us a call at
(504) 525-6369 if you have any questions. We can’t wait to see your photos!