Category Archives: New Orleans

Annual Endymeow in New Orleans

Do you have royalty in your household? As Endymeow 2016 draws near, The Cat Practice in New Orleans is pleased to announce we are now accepting nominations for the Royal Court of Endymeow 2016. Dress your kitty in his/her finest Mardi Gras regalia (a pair of beads or go all out in your cat’s finest costume) and email the photo to see if your kitty is chosen to be on the Royal Court. Don’t you want to see your cat as a duke or a maid? The pictures will be displayed at Endymeow 2016 and on our Facebook page after the event and will be enshrined on our website permanently.

Please email your kitty’s Mardi Gras portrait to endymeow@catpractice.com, and follow us on Facebook to look for your kitty’s pic on our page. When you send a picture of your cat in his/her Mardi Gras finest, you will receive an invitation to Endymeow 2016. If you have any questions about the photo submission policy or about Endymeow, give us a call at 504-525-6369. Take a look at the winners from 2015!

Annual Endymeow in New Orleans
Annual Endymeow in New Orleans

Happy Mardi Gras…..!!!!!!

View more pictures from Endymeow 2015

Parasite Prevention/Revolution

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Protect Your Cat from Fleas and Other Parasites

 You love your feline friend, and you want to keep them safe from anything that can pose a threat to their health. This includes those pesky parasites, many of which can cause diseases and other health problems for your cat. Now that it’s summer, these little critters will be multiplying and finding hosts to feed on, making your cat a potential target. Even indoor cats are at risk, since fleas and mosquitoes can easily make their way into your home.

The Cat Practice in New Orleans, LA recommends that you protect your cat from parasites with Revolution, the FDA-approved topical medication for cats that’s applied monthly. With just one dose, you can protect your cat from several dangerous internal and external parasites, including fleas, heartworms (caused by mosquitoes), ear mites, roundworms, and hookworms.

How Does Revolution Work?

 The active ingredient in Revolution is selamectin, which is a topical parasiticide and antihelminthic (worm killer). It’s quick and easy to apply and offers 30 days of protection from parasites with every application. You simply part your cat’s fur at the base of the neck and place the tube on the visible skin area. Then squeeze the tube a few times in that spot until it’s empty. Our doctors can demonstrate the procedure from beginning to end during your next visit so you can be sure you’re doing it correctly from home.

As an FDA-approved product, Revolution is safe and effective, both for your cat and your family, including cats that are breeding, pregnant, lactating, and heartworm-positive. And unlike other products, you don’t have to separate your cat from the rest of the family after you apply the medication.

Does My Cat Really Need Parasite Protection?

 This is a common question that’s asked of cat owners whose feline friends live indoors, and in most cases, the answer is YES! This is especially true if you have a dog in your home, since they can easily bring fleas in which can then infest your cat. Fleas can also hitch a ride on the soles of your shoes and end up on your carpet. Even just spending time on the balcony with your cat can put them at risk for fleas as well as mosquitoes.

The doctors at The Cat Practice in New Orleans, LA would be happy to speak with you about your cat’s specific parasite prevention needs and answer any questions you have about Revolution. Give us a call at (504) 525-6369 to schedule an appointment and to purchase a box for your feline friend!

 

Keep Your Cat Safe in a Heat Wave

The temperature is soaring, and it’s only going to get hotter. Make sure you know how to keep your cat safe in the summer heat.

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  1. Watch out for heatstroke. Symptoms include panting, lethargy, drooling, fever, vomiting and collapse. If you think your cat may have heatstroke, get the vet ASAP — the condition can cause permanent organ damage and death. Learn more about heatstroke in pets.
  2. Offer your cat several ways to cool off. Leave a fan on in a place where your cat can sit in front of it, add some ice cubes to her water or offer her a cool treat (check out our recipe for catsicles.)
  3. Let your cat find cool spots in the house. Your cat will seek out the cooler parts of your home, so make sure she has access to areas with tile floors or rooms that don’t get much sun.
  4. Play in the morning or evening. Any exercise should take place during the cooler hours of the day. This is especially important for young kittens and seniors, both of whom are very vulnerable to heatstroke. (If your cat has just eaten, make sure you give her some time to digest before you begin playtime.)
  5. Brush your cat often. A well-groomed, tangle-free coat will help keep your cat cool. (Learn more about grooming your cat.)

 

Article originally published by PetFinder.

Endymeow 2015 Winners on WWLTV

The 2015 Endymeow Bal Masque will be held on Friday, January 30, from 7-9 p.m. at The Cat Practice Veterinary hospital, 809 Magazine Street, in the Lower Garden District. You can learn more about Endymeow at the hospital’s Facebook page visit: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Cat-Practice-NOLA/109565355748387

 Check out our previous pics from 2014
endymeow 2015

The Cat Practice

The Cat Practice is an award-winning facility, the best cat hospital in New Orleans and the only one dedicated to cats only, located in the historic Lower Garden District of New Orleans at 1809 Magazine Street. We are a full-service practice, providing both Western medicine and Chinese veterinary medicine. We incorporate the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of any veterinary hospital…except we provide care just for cats! Visit: http://www.catpractice.com/

The Cat Practice of New Orleans Host its Annual Endymeow for 2015

NEW ORLEANS, LA — Jan. 22, 2015 — Hail, Krewe of Endymeow! Will your feline be dressing up in their finest Mardi Gras regalia for New Orleans’ annual Endymeow Bal Masque? If so, it’s time to send your pics! Photos of your fabulous feline can be sent to The Cat Practice Veterinary Hospital at endymeow@catpractice.com no later than Friday, January 23, to be considered for the Krewe. Please include your name, address, phone number, and your cat’s name in the body of the e-mail.

endymeow 2015

Be sure to also catch Dr. Cousins on WWL’s morning show with Eric Paulsen and Sally Ann Roberts (Channel 4) on Monday, January 26, at 8:30 a.m. CST with the newly crowned Royal Court of Endymeow, King Cheetoh Moreno and Queen Lila Terry. King Cheetoh and Queen Lila will be then introduced to the city of New Orleans prior to the masque and receive the honor of having their photos displayed for a year.

 Endymeow 2015

The 2015 Endymeow Bal Masque will be held on Friday, January 30, from 7-9 p.m. at The Cat Practice Veterinary hospital, 809 Magazine Street, in the Lower Garden District. You can learn more about Endymeow at the hospital’s Facebook page visit: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Cat-Practice-NOLA/109565355748387

 The Cat Practice

The Cat Practice is an award-winning facility, the best cat hospital in New Orleans and the only one dedicated to cats only, located in the historic Lower Garden District of New Orleans at 1809 Magazine Street. We are a full-service practice, providing both Western medicine and Chinese veterinary medicine. We incorporate the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of any veterinary hospital…except we provide care just for cats! Visit: http://www.catpractice.com/

 

 

 

ENDYMEOW 2015

We want to see your cat dressed up in their finest Mardi Gras regalia for our Endymeow 2015 Court and Krew! Submit your cat’s pictures to endymeow@catpractice.com today. Be sure to include your name, address, phone number, and your cats name in the body of the e-mail.

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Feeding Older Cats

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Cats begin to show visible age-related changes at about seven to twelve years of age. There are metabolic, immunologic and body composition changes, too. Some of these are unavoidable. Others can be managed with diet.

  1. Start your cat on a senior diet at about seven years of age.
  2. The main objectives in the feeding an older cat should be to maintain health and optimum body weight, slow or prevent the development of chronic disease, and minimize or improve clinical signs of diseases that may already be present.
  3. As a cat ages, health issues may arise, including:

    – deterioration of skin and coat
    – loss of muscle mass
    – more frequent intestinal problems
    – arthritis
    – obesity
    – dental problems
    – decreased ability to fight off infection

  4. Routine care for geriatric pets should involve a consistent daily routine and periodic veterinary examinations to assess the presence or progress of chronic disease. Stressful situations and abrupt changes in daily routines should be avoided. If a drastic change must be made to an older pet’s routine, try to minimize stress and to realize the change in a gradual manner.

Related Links

Weaning

During weaning, kittens gradually progress from dependence on a mother’s care to social independence. The process typically takes between four and six weeks, with most kittens completely weaned by the time they’re eight to ten weeks old.

Overweight Cats

Obesity is an extremely common problem in pets and, as with humans, can be detrimental to the health of a cat. The overweight pet has many added stresses upon his body and is at an increased risk of diabetes, liver problems and joint pain.

Nutrition Tips for Kittens

If you’re responsible for taking care of kittens in the first few months of their lives, you need to be prepared to move them from a diet of milk to regular kitten food. Here are some easy tips.

Nutrients Your Cat Needs

Barring any special needs, illness-related deficiencies or instructions from your vet, your pets should be able to get all the nutrients they need from high-quality commercial pet foods, which are formulated with these special standards in mind.

Feeding Your Adult Cat

Adult cats should eat enough of a high-quality, nutritious food to meet their energy needs and to maintain and repair body tissues. The amount you feed your adult cat should be based on his or her size and energy output.

Nutrients Your Dog Needs

If you would like to learn about what your pet’s body needs, and why, here are the six essential classes of nutrients fundamental for healthy living.

 

 

Source: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-care/feeding-older-cats

Is Your Cat Missing the Litter Box?

You have a problem. Your cat is thinking outside the box, and not in a good way. You may be wondering what you did to inspire so much “creative expression.” Is your cat punishing you? Is Fluffy just “bad”? No, and no. House soiling and missing the litter box is a sign that your cat needs some help.

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According to the Winn Feline Foundation, house soiling is the number one complaint among cat owners. The good news is that it is very treatable.

An accredited veterinarian can help you determine if the problem is medical or related to social or environmental stressors. In addition to a complete physical exam, the doctor will ask you specific “where and when” questions.

Health factors
Tony Buffington, DVM, PhD, a specialist in feline urinary disorders at The Ohio State University, and founder of the Indoor Cat Initiative says that many veterinarians recommend a urine test for every cat with a house soiling problem. The urinalysis will determine if blood, bacteria, or urinary crystals are present — signs that your cat might have feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD).
FLUTD is very common and can cause painful urination. Cats that begin to associate the litter box with pain will avoid it. Other medical possibilities include hyperthyroidism, kidney disease, diabetes, and arthritis and muscle or nerve disorders that might prevent your cat from getting to the litter box in time.

Environmental factors
If there is no medical cause, the next step is to look at environmental factors. Start with the litter box. Your cat might be avoiding the litter box because it is not cleaned well enough, you’ve changed the type of litter you use, or there is only one box for multiple cats.
Another possibility is that your cat is “marking” — spraying urine, typically on vertical objects such as walls and furniture, or in “socially significant” areas near doors or windows. Both male and female cats mark. The most common offenders are cats that have not been spayed or neutered.
Buffington says that stress can cause elimination problems too. For example, subtle aggression or harassment by other house cats or neighborhood cats may be an issue.

Indoor Cat Initiative
Even unremarkable changes in your home can make your cat anxious or fearful. Look around. Did anything change right before your cat started having problems? Did you get a new pet? A new couch? Maybe you just moved the old couch to a different part of the room, or had a dinner party. Cats are sensitive creatures and changes that seem small to you can throw your cat off his game. Check with your veterinarian about finding solutions that work for both you and your cat.

Source: http://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/pet_health_library/cat_care/behavior/missing_the_litter_box.aspx 

Hurricane Season Checklist for Your Cat

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Let The Cat Practice help you prepare your cat for a safe and smooth evacuation.

  • Is your cat current on his/her vaccinations? 
  • Is your cat microchipped and have current photo identification?
  • Do you have medication for travel?
  • Do you have enough medication and special food for extended evacuation?
  • Do you have heart worm and flea prevention for an extended evacuation?
  • Do you have enough food, water, bowls, litter boxes and litter for an extended evacuation?
  • Does your cat have a carrier?
  • Do you have an evacuation route planned?
  • Are you aware of the pet friendly hotels for evacuation? www.officialpethotels.com

Sign up for our internet based information system, Pet Portal, which is customizes for your cat. This free service has all of the pertinent medical information needed for your pet. You will receive an invite for Pet Portal via email.

Caring for pets during emergencies

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Nothing says it better than the horror story from Hurricane Floyd: A man was leaving his flooded home when he noticed a neighbor’s dogs swimming in circles around the yard. Wondering why the dogs didn’t simply swim to safety, the man swam over to investigate. To his horror, he found that the dogs had been left chained to a stake in the yard and were swimming frantically just to stay alive. He was able to rescue the dogs, but stories such as this pointedly demonstrate the need for to you to have a good action plan in place in case a natural disaster strikes your home. In this case, the dogs’ owner most likely had been told to leave everything behind and flee as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, his dogs nearly lost their lives as a result.

In the event of an emergency, your life and your family’s lives are the first you should be concerned with. You should only look to save your animals once you are sure you and your family will be safe. But once you are safe, you most likely will want to ensure the safety of your pets. Are you prepared?

Consider your location

First things first. You can only be prepared with a plan of action if you know what you’re planning for, so take some time to think about the area you live in. Some areas are naturally prone to certain disasters California’s earthquakes, for example. Find out what types of disasters have previously struck your area hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, blizzards, etc. Contacting your local emergency management office or Red Cross will help you to identify what could affect your particular neighborhood. You should also plan for non-natural disasters fires, gas leaks, chemical spills, etc. If, for example, there’s a big chemical processing plant in your area, then you need to be aware of the possible dangers so that you can react if need be. No matter where you live, you’ve got your own special brand of disaster just around the corner, and it may strike at any time.

If You Leave, They Leave

In the event that you have to leave your home, take your pets with you. If it isn’t safe for you to be there, it isn’t safe for them either. Too often people rationalize that their pets’ instincts will kick in, and they’ll be okay. Even if your cat, who has spent the last six years of his life hunting only the fake mice you pull around on a string for him, does have the instincts to survive, it doesn’t mean that the conditions are survivable. No drinkable water for you means no drinkable water for him too. Of course, you have to have somewhere to take your four-legged friends–Red Cross disaster shelters cannot accept pets. Make a list of all the places with in a 100-mile radius of your home where you might be able to take your pet if the need arises, include boarding facilities, veterinarians with boarding capabilities, hotels that will accept pets (ask if they’ll allow pets during a disaster situation), and animal shelters. (Use animal shelters only as a last resort, as they will be overburdened with other animals whose owners did not plan for them). Also, you need to gather your critters inside the house as soon as you are aware that you may have to leave, so that you can easily get them when it’s time to go. Then, when you do leave, make sure you have your little friends under firm control–even the best behaved dog can become scared during an emergency, making his behavior less than predictable.

Be prepared

Like a Boy Scout, you should always be prepared. This means having a disaster kit in your home as well as a smaller version in the trunk of your car if your pet routinely rides with you. Make sure that your pet’s kit is contained in something that is easy to pick up quickly and take out the door with you. You should replace this food and water every six months and rethink your pet’s needs for the kit once a year to make sure that the supplies meet your current needs the same collar that fits your new kitten is not likely to fit him a year later.

The kit should include a week’s supply of food and water in nonbreakable, airtight containers to ensure safety and freshness. If you pack canned food you’ll want to make sure you have a hand-held can opener too. And don’t forget a plastic dish that can double as a food and water dish. An extra collar and leash are also important things to have in your kit. You should also have a portable kennel for each of your critters handy. The San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals says that the official Red Cross policy is that there are no animals allowed in emergency shelters, but they have been known to make exceptions if the animal is securely confined. Pets such as birds will obviously have to have a carrier of some sort as they cannot be leashed. You will want to make certain that you have a well-stocked first-aid kit for your pet that includes tweezers, gauze bandages, first aid cream, antiseptic spray, and hydrogen peroxide. Ask your veterinarian about storing any medications that your pet may need to take regularly.

All the right papers

Many people have their home telephone numbers on their pets’ ID tags. You may want to have an extra set of tags made that list the number of a friend or family member outside the area so that if your phone lines are down, or you’ve been evacuated, your pets can still make it back to you. Another option is to simply include an out-of-area number on your pets’ everyday tag, which can be useful if you’re away on vacation too. And many people don’t have tags for their cats at all, even though they should. According to the 1996 National Council on Pet Population Study, out of one million dogs and 580,000 cats that were taken in as strays, only 17 percent of the dogs and two percent of the cats made it back to their owners. The American Humane Association strongly believes that tags are your pets’ ticket home. You may also want to consider having your pet microchipped or tattooed. And finally, don’t forget the paperwork. Have a copy of your pet’s recent vaccination records in your kit–some boarding facilities may require them before they will take your pet in. A recent picture of your pet may also come in handy if you should become separated and need to make “Lost” posters. Hopefully you won’t ever have to put them up, and hopefully you’ll never have to use your disaster plan. But if you do ever need it, you’ll be very thankful that you were prepared; it could make a trying time a bit easier for you and your faithful companion.

Source: http://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/pet_health_library/general_health_care/caring_for_pets_during_emergencies.aspx