Tag Archives: LA

Make Sure They Can Get Home: Check Your Pet’s Microchip

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Is your pet’s microchip up-to-date? If your pet were lost, would an animal hospital or shelter be able to contact you once your pet was found?

It’s important to get your pet microchipped; but it’s just as important to make sure that microchip contains the correct information in order for your four-legged friend to get home.

How does a microchip work?
The microchip, which is about the size of a grain of rice, is injected by a veterinarian or veterinary technician just beneath your pet’s skin in the area between the shoulder blades. This is usually done without anesthesia, and the experience can be compared to getting a vaccination.

Each microchip has a unique registration number that is entered into a database or registry, and is associated with your name and contact information. If your lost dog or cat is found by an animal hospital, shelter or humane society, they will use a microchip scanner to read the number and contact the registry to get your information.

Make sure you can be found, too
While it may be comforting to know the microchip won’t get lost or damaged, and that it will probably last the pet’s lifetime, the microchip is useless if you’re not updating your contact information with the registry. If your pet has been microchipped, keep the documentation paperwork so you can find the contact information for the registry. If you don’t have the documentation paperwork, contact the veterinarian or shelter where the chip was implanted.

Keep in mind there are more than a dozen companies that maintain databases of chip ID numbers in the U.S. By using AAHA’s Universal Pet Microchip Lookup at petmicrochiplookup.org, you can locate the registry for your chip by entering the microchip ID number. If you don’t have your pet’s microchip ID number, have a veterinarian scan it and give it to you.

Only about 17% of lost dogs and 2% of lost cats ever find their way back to their owners. Prevent the heartache and ensure your pet has an up-to-date microchip.

 

Originally published by Healthy Pet.

Parasite Prevention/Revolution

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Protect Your Cat from Fleas and Other Parasites

 You love your feline friend, and you want to keep them safe from anything that can pose a threat to their health. This includes those pesky parasites, many of which can cause diseases and other health problems for your cat. Now that it’s summer, these little critters will be multiplying and finding hosts to feed on, making your cat a potential target. Even indoor cats are at risk, since fleas and mosquitoes can easily make their way into your home.

The Cat Practice in New Orleans, LA recommends that you protect your cat from parasites with Revolution, the FDA-approved topical medication for cats that’s applied monthly. With just one dose, you can protect your cat from several dangerous internal and external parasites, including fleas, heartworms (caused by mosquitoes), ear mites, roundworms, and hookworms.

How Does Revolution Work?

 The active ingredient in Revolution is selamectin, which is a topical parasiticide and antihelminthic (worm killer). It’s quick and easy to apply and offers 30 days of protection from parasites with every application. You simply part your cat’s fur at the base of the neck and place the tube on the visible skin area. Then squeeze the tube a few times in that spot until it’s empty. Our doctors can demonstrate the procedure from beginning to end during your next visit so you can be sure you’re doing it correctly from home.

As an FDA-approved product, Revolution is safe and effective, both for your cat and your family, including cats that are breeding, pregnant, lactating, and heartworm-positive. And unlike other products, you don’t have to separate your cat from the rest of the family after you apply the medication.

Does My Cat Really Need Parasite Protection?

 This is a common question that’s asked of cat owners whose feline friends live indoors, and in most cases, the answer is YES! This is especially true if you have a dog in your home, since they can easily bring fleas in which can then infest your cat. Fleas can also hitch a ride on the soles of your shoes and end up on your carpet. Even just spending time on the balcony with your cat can put them at risk for fleas as well as mosquitoes.

The doctors at The Cat Practice in New Orleans, LA would be happy to speak with you about your cat’s specific parasite prevention needs and answer any questions you have about Revolution. Give us a call at (504) 525-6369 to schedule an appointment and to purchase a box for your feline friend!

 

Is Your Cat Missing the Litter Box?

You have a problem. Your cat is thinking outside the box, and not in a good way. You may be wondering what you did to inspire so much “creative expression.” Is your cat punishing you? Is Fluffy just “bad”? No, and no. House soiling and missing the litter box is a sign that your cat needs some help.

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According to the Winn Feline Foundation, house soiling is the number one complaint among cat owners. The good news is that it is very treatable.

An accredited veterinarian can help you determine if the problem is medical or related to social or environmental stressors. In addition to a complete physical exam, the doctor will ask you specific “where and when” questions.

Health factors
Tony Buffington, DVM, PhD, a specialist in feline urinary disorders at The Ohio State University, and founder of the Indoor Cat Initiative says that many veterinarians recommend a urine test for every cat with a house soiling problem. The urinalysis will determine if blood, bacteria, or urinary crystals are present — signs that your cat might have feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD).
FLUTD is very common and can cause painful urination. Cats that begin to associate the litter box with pain will avoid it. Other medical possibilities include hyperthyroidism, kidney disease, diabetes, and arthritis and muscle or nerve disorders that might prevent your cat from getting to the litter box in time.

Environmental factors
If there is no medical cause, the next step is to look at environmental factors. Start with the litter box. Your cat might be avoiding the litter box because it is not cleaned well enough, you’ve changed the type of litter you use, or there is only one box for multiple cats.
Another possibility is that your cat is “marking” — spraying urine, typically on vertical objects such as walls and furniture, or in “socially significant” areas near doors or windows. Both male and female cats mark. The most common offenders are cats that have not been spayed or neutered.
Buffington says that stress can cause elimination problems too. For example, subtle aggression or harassment by other house cats or neighborhood cats may be an issue.

Indoor Cat Initiative
Even unremarkable changes in your home can make your cat anxious or fearful. Look around. Did anything change right before your cat started having problems? Did you get a new pet? A new couch? Maybe you just moved the old couch to a different part of the room, or had a dinner party. Cats are sensitive creatures and changes that seem small to you can throw your cat off his game. Check with your veterinarian about finding solutions that work for both you and your cat.

Source: http://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/pet_health_library/cat_care/behavior/missing_the_litter_box.aspx 

Cat Friendly Practice: How Can I Benefit?

Veterinary clinics are now becoming Cat Friendly Practices by the American Association of Feline Practitioners.(AAFP). This means that they have made changes to decrease stress and provide a more calming environment such as feline-only waiting areas and examination rooms. Their staff has also been trained in feline-friendly handling and understanding cat behavior in order to increase the quality of care for your cat.

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  • They make an effort to have a calming environment.
  • They have incorporated a waiting room/area that reduces stress associated with noise, other pets or unfamiliar smells (methods can include feline-only area, cat-only appointment times, going directly into the exam room, etc.).
  • Staff are trained to understand the individualized needs of cats including feline specific behavior and facial features.
  • They implement the Feline-Friendly Handling Guidelines to facilitate a more positive experience.
  • They use a slow approach to achieve positive results.
  • They develop an individual plan based on your cat’s specific needs, preferences and behaviors.
  • They implement ways to make you and your cat be as comfortable as possible.
  • Staff continually obtain education on the most current feline research and guidelines.
  • They will help ensure that you are a valuable member of your cat’s healthcare team and help you understand your cat’s needs and what you can do at home to ensure they get the care they need.
  • Many use synthetic feline facial pheromones for a calming effect.
  • Many have a feline-only examination room that provides a safe, non-threatening area where cats can be examined calmly and effectively.
  • They have experience to recognize subtle, early signs of fear or anxiety and adapt appropriately.
  • Their cat ward, hospitalization area and operating room have been assessed to include appropriate feline equipment, tools and procedures.

Source: http://www.catvets.com/cfp/cat-owners/cat-owners-benefits