Tag Archives: NOLA

The third annual Cat Practice Calendar 2016 is out!

It’s purrfect for keeping up with your busy schedules and it makes a great gift to any cat fanatics (including you) that you might know. It features all the kitties that are (or want to be…!!!) part of our Cat Practice family of felines. This year, we are featuring the models on our Facebook (The Cat Practice NOLA). So, visit us there to see ALL the beautiful images of cats that were submitted to us for our calendar, including the ones that were chosen as models. Give us your comments. The calendars are only $19.99; and, we have a limited number at The Cat Practice. So, if you want one, call Ginja or JoAnn and reserve yours today. They make great Christmas gifts…for family members and friends. We look forward to hearing from you to order yours, and get your pics ready of your cat for next year’s 2017 Cat Practice calendar!

Anzelmo, Dusty Beane Kitties Cagle, Moti calendar for asia.20.07 Emmons, Bella1 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Fuoco, Hermionie Gokturk, Bertrand Huggins,Poulinho (2) Izen, Bindy and Bastien Lester, Charlie3

New Orleans’ 2016 Cat Practice Calendar

Calendar for Cats and Kittens in New Orleans

It’s that time of year again. We all had so much fun with our 2015 “Cat Practice Family” calendar, we’re going to do it again for 2016! If you want your kitty to be a poster pin-up cat, take your best shot and send it to The Cat Practice so we can highlight your feline family member as a monthly model for our 2016 cat calendar. We will pick the best photos submitted to represent each month.

Photo Submission Rules and Instructions:

Kitty photos will be accepted until November 1, 2015. If you would like to submit your cat’s photo for display on our 2016 calendar, please e-mail it (maximum of three pictures per cat) to calendar@catpractice.com. Pictures should be no smaller than 1 megapixel. Please also include the following information with your e-mail submission:

  1. Your name
  2. Your pet’s name
  3. City, state, and country
  4. The following statement MUST be copied and attached to your photo:

I agree that I am an amateur photographer of at least 18 years of age. I hereby grant The Cat Practice, Inc. the non-exclusive royalty/free irrevocable rights, exercisable in its sole discretion, to use, reproduce, copy, publish, display, distribute, perform, translate, adapt, modify, and otherwise use the images (in whole or in part) and to incorporate the image(s) in any and all market and media. I have the exclusive right to grant such rights to The Cat Practice, Inc. I agree to allow use of my cat’s name in publicity or advertising without compensation. I understand and agree that The Cat Practice shall have no obligation to copy, publish, display, or otherwise use the images, nor shall it be obligated to prevent or have any liability for, any unauthorized copying, publishing, displaying, or use of images.

When Will the Calendars Be Available?

The 2016 Cat Practice Calendar will be available for Christmas, just in time for the New Year, and will make great stocking stuffers. So, send your best kitty pics today, and give us a call at
(504) 525-6369 if you have any questions. We can’t wait to see your photos!

Make Sure They Can Get Home: Check Your Pet’s Microchip

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Is your pet’s microchip up-to-date? If your pet were lost, would an animal hospital or shelter be able to contact you once your pet was found?

It’s important to get your pet microchipped; but it’s just as important to make sure that microchip contains the correct information in order for your four-legged friend to get home.

How does a microchip work?
The microchip, which is about the size of a grain of rice, is injected by a veterinarian or veterinary technician just beneath your pet’s skin in the area between the shoulder blades. This is usually done without anesthesia, and the experience can be compared to getting a vaccination.

Each microchip has a unique registration number that is entered into a database or registry, and is associated with your name and contact information. If your lost dog or cat is found by an animal hospital, shelter or humane society, they will use a microchip scanner to read the number and contact the registry to get your information.

Make sure you can be found, too
While it may be comforting to know the microchip won’t get lost or damaged, and that it will probably last the pet’s lifetime, the microchip is useless if you’re not updating your contact information with the registry. If your pet has been microchipped, keep the documentation paperwork so you can find the contact information for the registry. If you don’t have the documentation paperwork, contact the veterinarian or shelter where the chip was implanted.

Keep in mind there are more than a dozen companies that maintain databases of chip ID numbers in the U.S. By using AAHA’s Universal Pet Microchip Lookup at petmicrochiplookup.org, you can locate the registry for your chip by entering the microchip ID number. If you don’t have your pet’s microchip ID number, have a veterinarian scan it and give it to you.

Only about 17% of lost dogs and 2% of lost cats ever find their way back to their owners. Prevent the heartache and ensure your pet has an up-to-date microchip.

 

Originally published by Healthy Pet.

Parasite Prevention/Revolution

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Protect Your Cat from Fleas and Other Parasites

 You love your feline friend, and you want to keep them safe from anything that can pose a threat to their health. This includes those pesky parasites, many of which can cause diseases and other health problems for your cat. Now that it’s summer, these little critters will be multiplying and finding hosts to feed on, making your cat a potential target. Even indoor cats are at risk, since fleas and mosquitoes can easily make their way into your home.

The Cat Practice in New Orleans, LA recommends that you protect your cat from parasites with Revolution, the FDA-approved topical medication for cats that’s applied monthly. With just one dose, you can protect your cat from several dangerous internal and external parasites, including fleas, heartworms (caused by mosquitoes), ear mites, roundworms, and hookworms.

How Does Revolution Work?

 The active ingredient in Revolution is selamectin, which is a topical parasiticide and antihelminthic (worm killer). It’s quick and easy to apply and offers 30 days of protection from parasites with every application. You simply part your cat’s fur at the base of the neck and place the tube on the visible skin area. Then squeeze the tube a few times in that spot until it’s empty. Our doctors can demonstrate the procedure from beginning to end during your next visit so you can be sure you’re doing it correctly from home.

As an FDA-approved product, Revolution is safe and effective, both for your cat and your family, including cats that are breeding, pregnant, lactating, and heartworm-positive. And unlike other products, you don’t have to separate your cat from the rest of the family after you apply the medication.

Does My Cat Really Need Parasite Protection?

 This is a common question that’s asked of cat owners whose feline friends live indoors, and in most cases, the answer is YES! This is especially true if you have a dog in your home, since they can easily bring fleas in which can then infest your cat. Fleas can also hitch a ride on the soles of your shoes and end up on your carpet. Even just spending time on the balcony with your cat can put them at risk for fleas as well as mosquitoes.

The doctors at The Cat Practice in New Orleans, LA would be happy to speak with you about your cat’s specific parasite prevention needs and answer any questions you have about Revolution. Give us a call at (504) 525-6369 to schedule an appointment and to purchase a box for your feline friend!

 

Feeding Older Cats

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Cats begin to show visible age-related changes at about seven to twelve years of age. There are metabolic, immunologic and body composition changes, too. Some of these are unavoidable. Others can be managed with diet.

  1. Start your cat on a senior diet at about seven years of age.
  2. The main objectives in the feeding an older cat should be to maintain health and optimum body weight, slow or prevent the development of chronic disease, and minimize or improve clinical signs of diseases that may already be present.
  3. As a cat ages, health issues may arise, including:

    – deterioration of skin and coat
    – loss of muscle mass
    – more frequent intestinal problems
    – arthritis
    – obesity
    – dental problems
    – decreased ability to fight off infection

  4. Routine care for geriatric pets should involve a consistent daily routine and periodic veterinary examinations to assess the presence or progress of chronic disease. Stressful situations and abrupt changes in daily routines should be avoided. If a drastic change must be made to an older pet’s routine, try to minimize stress and to realize the change in a gradual manner.

Related Links

Weaning

During weaning, kittens gradually progress from dependence on a mother’s care to social independence. The process typically takes between four and six weeks, with most kittens completely weaned by the time they’re eight to ten weeks old.

Overweight Cats

Obesity is an extremely common problem in pets and, as with humans, can be detrimental to the health of a cat. The overweight pet has many added stresses upon his body and is at an increased risk of diabetes, liver problems and joint pain.

Nutrition Tips for Kittens

If you’re responsible for taking care of kittens in the first few months of their lives, you need to be prepared to move them from a diet of milk to regular kitten food. Here are some easy tips.

Nutrients Your Cat Needs

Barring any special needs, illness-related deficiencies or instructions from your vet, your pets should be able to get all the nutrients they need from high-quality commercial pet foods, which are formulated with these special standards in mind.

Feeding Your Adult Cat

Adult cats should eat enough of a high-quality, nutritious food to meet their energy needs and to maintain and repair body tissues. The amount you feed your adult cat should be based on his or her size and energy output.

Nutrients Your Dog Needs

If you would like to learn about what your pet’s body needs, and why, here are the six essential classes of nutrients fundamental for healthy living.

 

 

Source: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-care/feeding-older-cats

Is Your Cat Missing the Litter Box?

You have a problem. Your cat is thinking outside the box, and not in a good way. You may be wondering what you did to inspire so much “creative expression.” Is your cat punishing you? Is Fluffy just “bad”? No, and no. House soiling and missing the litter box is a sign that your cat needs some help.

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According to the Winn Feline Foundation, house soiling is the number one complaint among cat owners. The good news is that it is very treatable.

An accredited veterinarian can help you determine if the problem is medical or related to social or environmental stressors. In addition to a complete physical exam, the doctor will ask you specific “where and when” questions.

Health factors
Tony Buffington, DVM, PhD, a specialist in feline urinary disorders at The Ohio State University, and founder of the Indoor Cat Initiative says that many veterinarians recommend a urine test for every cat with a house soiling problem. The urinalysis will determine if blood, bacteria, or urinary crystals are present — signs that your cat might have feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD).
FLUTD is very common and can cause painful urination. Cats that begin to associate the litter box with pain will avoid it. Other medical possibilities include hyperthyroidism, kidney disease, diabetes, and arthritis and muscle or nerve disorders that might prevent your cat from getting to the litter box in time.

Environmental factors
If there is no medical cause, the next step is to look at environmental factors. Start with the litter box. Your cat might be avoiding the litter box because it is not cleaned well enough, you’ve changed the type of litter you use, or there is only one box for multiple cats.
Another possibility is that your cat is “marking” — spraying urine, typically on vertical objects such as walls and furniture, or in “socially significant” areas near doors or windows. Both male and female cats mark. The most common offenders are cats that have not been spayed or neutered.
Buffington says that stress can cause elimination problems too. For example, subtle aggression or harassment by other house cats or neighborhood cats may be an issue.

Indoor Cat Initiative
Even unremarkable changes in your home can make your cat anxious or fearful. Look around. Did anything change right before your cat started having problems? Did you get a new pet? A new couch? Maybe you just moved the old couch to a different part of the room, or had a dinner party. Cats are sensitive creatures and changes that seem small to you can throw your cat off his game. Check with your veterinarian about finding solutions that work for both you and your cat.

Source: http://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/pet_health_library/cat_care/behavior/missing_the_litter_box.aspx 

Dr. Cousins on WWLTV Discussing Feline Heartworms